Simone Kearney

Song of Amergin, Installation at Klaus Von Nichtssagend Gallery, Acrylic, dye, muslin, rope, wood, 2019

Simone Kearney was born in Dublin, Ireland, and grew up there until moving to the United States as a teenager. Moving countries foregrounded the spaces in-between, acts of navigation. The friction of what might not quite align promulgates kinds of foam.

I live in New York City, make work in my studio and in my bed, walk, teach, collaborate, act in my friend’s plays sometimes, make visual translations or write poems in response to their work. I’m currently reading Etel Adnan, Jorge Luis Borges, Clarice Lispector, and thinking about the relationship between enigmas and volume. Can an enigma sag?

Song of Amergin, Installation at the Hambidge Center for the Arts, Rabun Gap, GA, Acrylic, dye, muslin, rope, wood, cinder blocks, 2019
Song of Amergin, Installation at Klaus Von Nichtssagend Gallery, Acrylic, dye, muslin, rope, wood, 2019

 

 

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  1. […] Simone Kearney is presently working on a few projects – one is a project she has been developing over time titled Song of Amergin. The series of paintings is based on what is said to be the work of the first Irish poet. Kearney’s first response to the poetry was to create a series of paintings. Then drew from the concept of the wind on the sea, using acrylic and dye on muslin to create the works. To hear more about this series, about the mythological history of Ireland and Kearney’s other work, including how she relates poetry to prisms, listen to the complete interview. […]

  2. […] Simone Kearney is presently working on a few projects – one is a project she has been developing over time titled Song of Amergin. The series of paintings is based on what is said to be the work of the first Irish poet. Kearney’s first response to the poetry was to create a series of paintings. Then drew from the concept of the wind on the sea, using acrylic and dye on muslin to create the works. To hear more about this series, about the mythological history of Ireland and Kearney’s other work, including how she relates poetry to prisms, listen to the complete interview. […]