Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is the award-winning author of a memoir and three novels, and the editor of five nonfiction anthologies.

Her memoir, The End of San Francisco, won a Lambda Literary Award, and her previous title, Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?: Flaming Challenges to Masculinity, Objectification, and the Desire to Conform, was an American Library Association Stonewall Honor Book.

Her new novel, Sketchtasy, is just out—Sarah Schulman says, “If Sketchtasy doesn’t become a classic, we are doomed.”

For her current tour schedule, click here.

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  1. […] Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is a writer living and working in Baltimore while working on a book project. Sycamore’s current book, Sketchtasy, flowed forth after Sycamore finished writing an autobiography. The stories for the book come from Sycamore’s experiences in Boston during the mid-1990s and the gay club culture there. What came through during the writing was the trauma that touched upon every aspect of this experience in the context of a world that often does not look kindly on lgbtq culture. Following the eruption of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, the 90s ushered in a new generation in a sense, those who, rather than losing all of their friends to the disease instead came of age during that time of prodigious loss. […]

  2. […] Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is a writer living and working in Baltimore while working on a book project. Sycamore’s current book, Sketchtasy, flowed forth after Sycamore finished writing an autobiography. The stories for the book come from Sycamore’s experiences in Boston during the mid-1990s and the gay club culture there. What came through during the writing was the trauma that touched upon every aspect of this experience in the context of a world that often does not look kindly on lgbtq culture. Following the eruption of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, the 90s ushered in a new generation in a sense, those who, rather than losing all of their friends to the disease instead came of age during that time of prodigious loss. […]