Mary Mattingly

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Mary Mattingly is a visual artist. She founded Swale, an edible landscape on a barge in New York City to circumvent public land laws.
Swale helped co-create the “foodway” in Concrete Plant Park, the Bronx in 2017. The “foodway” is the first time New York City Parks is allowing people to publicly forage in over 100 years. Mattingly recently completed a sculpture “Pull” with the International Havana Biennial with the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de la Habana and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. In 2018 she worked with BRIC Arts to build “What Happens After” which involved dismantling a military vehicle and deconstructing its mineral supply chain. Mattingly is currently artist in residence at the Brooklyn Public Library and is working towards an Ecotopian Library,  a learning center for art and creativity in the face of climate change. Her work has also been exhibited at Storm King, the International Center of Photography, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Palais de Tokyo. Her work has been featured in Aperture Magazine, Art in America, Artforum, Sculpture Magazine, The New York Times, New York Magazine, Le Monde Magazine, New Yorker, and on BBC News, NPR, on Art21. Her work has been included in books such as MIT Press Documents of Contemporary Art series titled “Nature”, and Henry Sayre’s A World of Art, published by Pearson Education Inc.
Along the Lines of Displacement, Storm King, 2018
Swale, Concrete Plant Park, Bronx, 2017
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  1. […] Mary Mattingly spoke to us once again after a previous conversation five years ago when she discussed a floating barge-based installation. Currently she still lives and works in New York though she has just returned from Colorado where she spent a semester in fellowship at University of Colorado, Boulder. The project that unfolded in Boulder was a collaborative work with systems scientists, graduate students from the university and other artists to create what she calls taxonomical sculptures. Mattingly created a library with four main themes: Commons, Art & Poetry, Ecosophy and Geology. Within each theme were books, objects and sound-based artwork. Mattingly sought to locate art that would fit into these categories and that represented the idea of a tool, that is something that aids in work going forward. To hear more about this project and more, including an upcoming project at Brooklyn Public Library involving watershed stewardship in New York City, listen to the complete interview. […]

  2. […] Mary Mattingly spoke to us once again after a previous conversation five years ago when she discussed a floating barge-based installation. Currently she still lives and works in New York though she has just returned from Colorado where she spent a semester in fellowship at University of Colorado, Boulder. The project that unfolded in Boulder was a collaborative work with systems scientists, graduate students from the university and other artists to create what she calls taxonomical sculptures. Mattingly created a library with four main themes: Commons, Art & Poetry, Ecosophy and Geology. Within each theme were books, objects and sound-based artwork. Mattingly sought to locate art that would fit into these categories and that represented the idea of a tool, that is something that aids in work going forward. To hear more about this project and more, including an upcoming project at Brooklyn Public Library involving watershed stewardship in New York City, listen to the complete interview. […]