Ellen Winkler

Ellen Winkler is a print maker, painter and graphic designer who lives in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. She studied art during her undergraduate years at Kalamazoo College in Kalamazoo, Michigan. That educational experience afforded her the opportunity to live and work in New York City as a participant in the Great Lakes Colleges Association “Semester in New York”.  She worked as an apprentice to the artist, Willard Midgette.

She came to the Washington area in 1977 to pursue a graduate degree at George Washington University, where she focused on Graphic Design. She was Art Director of The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Opinion and Arts weekly magazine, The Chronicle Review and is retiredShe is a member of the Los Angeles Printmaking Society.

Deeply influenced by the artist Jack Boul, she has spent much time exploring monotypes as a means of responding to the landscape. She has recently been working with drypoint, copper engraving and etching. Her etchings particularly reflect recent drawings which are explorations of seen and unseen places. Additionally, she has been rendering landscapes using oil paint on prepared board.
“Getting to There”; 2020; 6 5/8″ x 7 1/2”; Oil on prepared board
“Tired Going Home”; 2020; 6″ x 5; Drypoint and Engraving printed with Chine Collé
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  1. […] Ellen Winkler lives and works in the Washington DC metro area where she says she has felt relatively safe during the pandemic living in a place with strong safety measures. Both Winkler and her husband are artists and have found plenty to fill their time while they shelter at home. Like many artists who have spoken with us during the pandemic, they have found this time beneficial in terms of producing art free of outside obligations. Winkler is a printmaker as is her husband. Recently she has been doing a lot of work at an old farm where she came upon a dilapidated log cabin. She receive permission to spend time on the farm studying the landscape and buildings, noticing how the light struck them, drawing them and making etchings. Winkler also turned to a collection of sketches she has made over the years of people on the subway, using them as the basis for drypoint etchings. Winkler also moved to oil painting landscapes, something that brings up memories of her youth spent in Michigan. To hear more about Ellen Winkler’s work, as well as a short discussion about the nature of these Praxis discussions, listen to the complete interview. […]

  2. […] Ellen Winkler lives and works in the Washington DC metro area where she says she has felt relatively safe during the pandemic living in a place with strong safety measures. Both Winkler and her husband are artists and have found plenty to fill their time while they shelter at home. Like many artists who have spoken with us during the pandemic, they have found this time beneficial in terms of producing art free of outside obligations. Winkler is a printmaker as is her husband. Recently she has been doing a lot of work at an old farm where she came upon a dilapidated log cabin. She receive permission to spend time on the farm studying the landscape and buildings, noticing how the light struck them, drawing them and making etchings. Winkler also turned to a collection of sketches she has made over the years of people on the subway, using them as the basis for drypoint etchings. Winkler also moved to oil painting landscapes, something that brings up memories of her youth spent in Michigan. To hear more about Ellen Winkler’s work, as well as a short discussion about the nature of these Praxis discussions, listen to the complete interview. […]