Desi Mundo

Desi Mundo was interviewed last year, and is an Oakland-based spray paint educator, hip-hop cultural diplomat and the founder of the Community Rejuvenation Project, a pavement to policy mural organization that has produced more than 250 murals, throughout the Bay Area as well as nationally and internationally. His mural with Pancho Peskador, the “Universal Language” galvanized the Oakland community in the struggle against gentrification resulting in $20 million in community benefits, as documented in the acclaimed documentary film “Alice Street.” Desi’s legacy as an educator and youth worker in K-12 schools spans two decades. He received the “Rising Leaders” Fellowship from the Youth Leadership Institute in 2005 and has been awarded the Individual Artist grant from the City of Oakland eight times. Desi recently completed “AscenDance,” a 91 ft. tall acrylic mural on Oakland’s Greenlining Institute, with an all-woman all-star team of brush painters.
AscenDance in Production (photo by Eric Arnold)
The complete mural getting several layers of clear coat for lasting protection.
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  1. […] Desi Mundo spoke to us a second time – we first connected with him in March as the pandemic was beginning to take hold. This time we spoke about teaching art from a distance about which Desi Mundo said he has to figure out how that will work. His time has been taken up with a mural project but the time has come for him to begin shaping the year ahead at the charter school where he teaches. For the first four weeks of the school year, students will participate in full-time distance learning before the plan is re-evaluated. Consistency is key in teaching, but during this time when the method of instruction is in constant flux, that is difficult if not impossible to achieve. To hear more about this important conversation that touches on some deep and complex issues facing teachers, parents and students, and to hear Desi Mundo’s plans for this initial distance learning phase, listen to the complete interview. […]

  2. […] Desi Mundo spoke to us a second time – we first connected with him in March as the pandemic was beginning to take hold. This time we spoke about teaching art from a distance about which Desi Mundo said he has to figure out how that will work. His time has been taken up with a mural project but the time has come for him to begin shaping the year ahead at the charter school where he teaches. For the first four weeks of the school year, students will participate in full-time distance learning before the plan is re-evaluated. Consistency is key in teaching, but during this time when the method of instruction is in constant flux, that is difficult if not impossible to achieve. To hear more about this important conversation that touches on some deep and complex issues facing teachers, parents and students, and to hear Desi Mundo’s plans for this initial distance learning phase, listen to the complete interview. […]