Gina Apostol

Photo credit: Margarita Corporan

Gina Apostol’s fourth novel, Insurrecto, was named by Publishers’ Weekly one of the Ten Best Books of 2018 and selected as an Editor’s Choice of the NYT. Her third book, Gun Dealers’ Daughter, won the 2013 PEN/Open Book Award.

Her first two novels, Bibliolepsy and The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata, both won the Juan Laya Prize for the Novel (Philippine National Book Award). She was a fellow at Civitella Ranieri in Umbria, Italy, and Emily Harvey Foundation, among others. Her essays and stories have appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Review of Books, Foreign Policy, Gettysburg Review, Massachusetts Review, and others. She lives in New York City and western Massachusetts and grew up in Tacloban, Leyte, in the Philippines. She teaches at the Fieldston School in New York City.

 

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  1. […] Gina Apostol joined us in early September from New York City where she had just returned the week we spoke after leaving in March 2020 when her school shut down. She spent the pandemic living with her partner in Massachusetts and teaching remotely. The stress of the pandemic made her more prolific in terms of work, allowing her to finish a novel during her time in lockdown. The novel began as one story, but it changed during a time of global mourning to being a book about the loss of Apostol’s mother. To hear more including an extensive discussion of the violent situation in the Phillippines, listen to the complete interview. […]

  2. […] Gina Apostol joined us in early September from New York City where she had just returned the week we spoke after leaving in March 2020 when her school shut down. She spent the pandemic living with her partner in Massachusetts and teaching remotely. The stress of the pandemic made her more prolific in terms of work, allowing her to finish a novel during her time in lockdown. The novel began as one story, but it changed during a time of global mourning to being a book about the loss of Apostol’s mother. To hear more including an extensive discussion of the violent situation in the Phillippines, listen to the complete interview. […]