Benjamin Bertocci

Children’s Singer oil on plastic entombed canvas 8”x8” 2021

Benjamin Bertocci lives with his small family and has been working out of his studio in Queens, New York since 2005. He was raised in Stockbridge Massachusetts, and attended Bard College at Simon’s Rock, UMASS Amherst, and worked as Visiting Assistant professor of Printmaking at Southern Illinois University.

He primarily shows with VonAmmonco Gallery.

Children’s Singer, oil on plastic entombed canvas, 8”x8”, 2021
Holocene Threnody XVI, oil on marble drink coaster, 4”x4”, 2020
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  1. […] Benjamin Bertocci spoke to us from New York City where he is at work on a new series of large paintings. He has an upcoming show with another artist at VonAmmonco Gallery in Washington, D.C. The show will be all new work, mostly larger paintings. The paintings represent pixels and are about 4′ tall by 3′ wide. Bertocci had been working on small pieces, and he has essentially taken the images in these and blown them up to this larger size. His medium is oil and plastic entombed on canvas meaning that he takes white artist canvas and uses an epoxy resin to create a mold that covers the front and sides of the painting, in essence entombing the painting in plastic. To hear more about his work, listen to the complete interview. […]

  2. […] Benjamin Bertocci spoke to us from New York City where he is at work on a new series of large paintings. He has an upcoming show with another artist at VonAmmonco Gallery in Washington, D.C. The show will be all new work, mostly larger paintings. The paintings represent pixels and are about 4′ tall by 3′ wide. Bertocci had been working on small pieces, and he has essentially taken the images in these and blown them up to this larger size. His medium is oil and plastic entombed on canvas meaning that he takes white artist canvas and uses an epoxy resin to create a mold that covers the front and sides of the painting, in essence entombing the painting in plastic. To hear more about his work, listen to the complete interview. […]