Andréa Stanislav

Currents 112: Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

Andréa Stanislav (b. 1968, Chicago) is an American artist based in New York City and Minneapolis. Her hybrid practice of sculpture, video installation, and public art explores the architecture of empire while being anchored in a collision of beauty and horror — dualities that intimate sublimity. Ms. Stanislav received an MFA from Alfred University, New York; and a BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Her work has been exhibited internationally at museums, contemporary art centers, galleries, biennials, site-specific public locations and art fairs. Selected solo exhibitions and projects include: The Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO; The Museum of the Defense and Siege of Leningrad, St. Petersburg, Russia; The 2014 Manifesta 10 European Biennial/Art-Centre Pushkinskaya-10 Parallel Public Program, St. Petersburg, Russia; Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN; Weisman Art Museum, Minneapolis, MN; 21c Contemporary Art Museum, Louisville, KY; The Cynthia Corbett Gallery, London, UK; Ca’D’Oro Gallery, New York City, NY; Pelham Art Center, Pelham, NY, Packer Schopf Gallery, Chicago, IL; thisisnotashop, Dublin, Ireland; The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Omaha, NE; and the Grunwald Gallery of Art, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

Stanislav’s work has also has been featured and exhibited at: The Museum of Non-Conformist Art, St. Petersburg, The 5th Moscow Biennial, Moscow, Russia; The U.S (Ambassador’s) Residence, Stockholm, Sweden; Fieldgate Gallery, London, UK; Al Sabah Gallery, Kuwait City, Kuwait; Ormeau Baths Gallery, Belfast, Northern Ireland; Socrates Sculpture Park, New York City, NY; Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, Wilmington, DE; Minnesota Museum of American Art, St. Paul, MN; Plains Art Museum, Fargo, ND; The John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Sheboygan, WI; Kentucky Museum of Arts and Craft, Louisville, KY; Garis and Hahn Gallery, New York City, NY; House of the Nobleman, New York City, NY; Dumbo Arts Center, Brooklyn, NY. Andréa Stanislav’s work is represented by The Cynthia Corbett Gallery, London, UK; Ca’D’Oro Gallery, New York City, NY; Melissa Morgan Gallery, Palm Desert, CA, and K35 Gallery, Moscow, Russia.

Ms. Stanislav has been the recipient of numerous awards including The 2015/2016 Freund Teaching Fellowship, Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, Washington University, St. Louis and the St. Louis Art Museum; The 2015 Target Studio Artist in Resident, Weisman Art Museum, Minneapolis, MN; The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council 2012 Swing Space Artist Residency, New York City, NY; a 2010-2011 McKnight Artists Fellowship for Visual Arts, Minneapolis, MN; a Socrates Sculpture Park 2009 Jerome Emerging Artist Fellowship, New York City, NY. She is an Associate Professor of Sculpture in the Department of Art, University of Minnesota – Minneapolis.

The book mentioned during the interview was – Secondhand Time, by Svetlana Alexievich.

“Nightmare (on the Neva),” public video project with the Manifesta Biennial 10 /Pushkinskaya 10 Art Centre Parallel Public Program, St Petersburg Russia, July 25 – 26, 2014. The LED video event screen (16′ x 20′) installed on a riverboat created the illusion of a white horse at night galloping on the Neva River past the Hermitage Museum. The artwork took full advantage of the sight lines, vistas, and history of St Petersburg, engaging the city by water in its totality as a historic space on a scale that had never attempted by an artist. “Nightmare” has also been performed on the Mississippi between Minneapolis and St. Paul MN. The project will continue to migrate globally.
Solo exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, “Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité,” March 24 – June 19, 2016, four channel drone video installation, with mirror-polished stainless steel sculptures, chrome plated horse skull and water sourced from the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.
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  1. […] Andrea Stanislav creates work that is rooted in political and wartime struggles within Russia. She explores the intersection of art within these desperate times. In part of her upcoming installation she references empty picture frames left hanging at the Hermitage during multiple invasions. “It was very much a message that the artwork will return,” she says. This idea that art will return and that the people will eventually prevail is threaded throughout her work. Stanislav examines “layers of history” juxtaposing beauty with horror. An orchestral concert played for a starving population, a beautiful park situated over mass graves. Her work has been exhibited around the world. […]

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